Click here to find poison free alternatives for homes and businesses

 

What is rodenticide?

                               Courtesy of urbancarnivores.org

                               Courtesy of urbancarnivores.org

Rodent poison is an indiscriminate killer of wildlife and pets. 

Each day, local wildlife and pets are poisoned by homeowners, local businesses, and professional exterminators. The poison comes from common household pesticides, the most dangerous of which are called “Anticoagulant Rodenticides.” This type of poison is easily purchased targets rats, mice, gophers and squirrels.

Unfortunately, they're also responsible for the indiscriminate deaths of hawks, owls, bobcats, coyotes, and mountain lions. Primary poisoning occurs when the targeted animal consumes the rodenticide bait. Secondary poisoning occurs when a predator consumes the poisoned prey. Domestic animals like dogs and cats are also vulnerable to these poisons.

Rat poison or anticoagulant rodenticides work by interfering with blood clotting, which results in uncontrollable bleeding and death.  Second-generation anticoagulants — including brodifacoum, bromadiolone, difethialone and difenacoum are slow-acting and therefore are often eaten for several days by rats and mice, causing the toxins to accumulate to many times the lethal dose in their tissues. Predators or scavengers like hawks, owls, foxes and mountain lions that feed on poisoned rodents don't stand a chance against these high levels of poison. The LAUSD uses more than twenty different poisons in our schools, including anticoagulant rodenticides.

Update: The LA Department of Recreation & Parks has agreed to stop using second-generation rodenticide.  Will you make the same commitment?  Click here to find out why you should tell your exterminator to "lick it..."

Watch our short film to learn more about rodenticides.
 

Each day our wildlife is in danger of being poisoned by homeowners, local businesses, and professional exterminators. The poison comes from common household pesticides, the most dangerous of which are called "Anticoagulant Rodenticides." This type of poison is easily purchased and commonly used to kill rodents.

Please help CLAW prevent anticoagulant rodenticides from destroying wildlife, killing our pets and making our children sick. Act now and please make a donation

Secondary Poisoning Up Close

The female mountain lion "P-34" died in October, 2015 because she ate a rat poisoned by rodenticide.  According to research provided by the National Park Service, there has been widespread exposure to rat poisons among wildlife in and around the Santa Monica Mountains.

The female mountain lion "P-34" died in October, 2015 because she ate a rat poisoned by rodenticide.  According to research provided by the National Park Service, there has been widespread exposure to rat poisons among wildlife in and around the Santa Monica Mountains.

If you’re a mountain lion in the Santa Monica Mountains, this is just not an easy place to grow up. From our roads to rat poisons to potentially increased interactions with other mountain lions, it is very difficult for young animals to make it to adulthood and establish their own home range to reproduce.
— Dr. Seth Riley, wildlife ecologist for the National Park Service
       Photo courtesy of Valley Wildlife Care

       Photo courtesy of Valley Wildlife Care

         Photo courtesy of Valley Wildlife Care

         Photo courtesy of Valley Wildlife Care

The very sick bob cat that arrived this morning has been diagnosed with active rodenticide poisoning. Despite the on-going mange which was probably a result of previous pesticide/rodenticide poisons, he has come into contact with poisons again and this time, it’s life threatening. His blood is so anemic that he should not be alive. He is bleeding internally and all of his vital functions are shutting down. He is so emaciated that he has lost all of his muscle mass. He weighed in at a mere 11 lbs.

Our medical team is working hard and we are trying to keep him alive long enough until our donor bob cat arrives from almost 200 miles away. A healthy bob cat will be used to administer a transfusion.
— Brenda Varvarigos, Valley Wildlife Care (Closed 2011)
"Rosie" the coyote the day she was rescued in Laurel Canyon. She went into treatment for rodenticide induced mange and secondary infections. 

"Rosie" the coyote the day she was rescued in Laurel Canyon. She went into treatment for rodenticide induced mange and secondary infections. 

Rodenticides are having a terrible impact on the wildlife in the mountains in and around Los Angeles. I’m pleased to be working with CLAW and looking into ways we can protect our mountain lions and bobcats and restore the natural balance of pest control in our wild areas.
— Councilmember Paul Koretz

STEP 1: Write in to make your voice heard in Los Angeles

CLAW needs your support as we lobby the City Council to stop the use of ALL anticoagulant rodenticides in parks and ecologically sensitive areas in the city of Los Angeles.  City Council File 13-1580 MUST be heard again in committee. 

Please send emails using the form below.  

Name *
Name
PLEASE COPY AND INSERT THE FOLLOWING SUBJECT TITLE: Public Comment Council File 13-1580
PLEASE COPY AND INSERT THE FOLLOWING MESSAGE: I support the Citizens for Los Angeles Wildlife initiative to create an ordinance that will include: A city-wide ban on the sale and purchase of anticoagulant rodenticides. A prohibition of the municipal, commercial, industrial, professional and private use of anticoagulant rodenticides particularly in our hillsides and other ecologically-sensitive areas and/or within 100 feet of parks, school zones, playgrounds and play structures. A system of punitive fines to be instituted to support this ordinance, with additional fines for rodenticide usage in hillsides and ecologically sensitive areas.

STEP 2: Call the Mayor and your City Councilmembers (LA Residents)


PHONE MESSAGE (when calling, please identify yourself as a constituent)

KEEP IT SIMPLE: "I am asking the Mayor/ Councilmember to please support Citizens for Los Angeles Wildlife and ban the purchase, sale and use of anticoagulant rat poison in Los Angeles."

CONTACTS:
Mayor Eric Garcetti
Los Angeles City Hall
200 N. Spring St.
Los Angeles, CA  90012
Phone: 213-978-0600   Fax: 213-978-0750
Email: mayor.garcetti@lacity.org

Distict 1 - Gilbert Cedillo
Phone: 213-473-7001  Fax: 213-485-8907
Email: councilmember.cedillo@lacity.org

District 2 - Paul Krekorian
Phone: 213-473-7002  Fax: 213-680-7895
Email: councilmember.krekorian@lacity.org

District 3 - Bob Blumenfield
Phone: 213-473-7003  
Email: councilmember.blumenfield@lacity.org

District 4 - David Ryu
Phone: (213) 473-7004 
Email: councilmember.ryu@lacity.org

District 5 - Paul Koretz
Phone: 213-473-7005  Fax: 213-978-2250
Email: councilmember.koretz@lacity.org

District 6 - Nury Martinez
Phone: 213-473-7006  Fax: 213-847-0549
Email: councilmember.martinez@lacity.org

District 7 - Felipe Fuentes
Phone: 213-473-7007   Fax: 213-847-0707
Email: councilmember.fuentes@lacity.org

District 8 - Marqueece Harris-Dawson
Phone: (213) 485-7616  
Email: councilmember.harris-dawson@lacity.org

District 9 - Curren D. Price, Jr
Phone: 213-473-7009  Fax: 213-473-5946
Email: councilmember.price@lacity.org

District 10 - Herb J. Wesson, Jr.
Phone: 213-473-7010   Fax: 213-485-9829
Email: councilmember.wesson@lacity.org

District 11 - Mike Bonin
Phone: 213-473-7011 Fax: 213-473-6926
Email: councilmember.bonin@lacity.org

District 12 - Mitchell Englander
Phone: 213-473-7012  Fax: 213-473-6925
Email: councilmember.englander@lacity.org

District 13 - Mitch O'Farrell
Phone: 213-473-7013  Fax: 213-613-0819
Email: councilmember.ofarrell@lacity.org

District 14 - Jose Huizar
Phone: 213-473-7014  Fax: 213-847-0680
Email: councilmember.huizar@lacity.org

District 15 - Joe Buscaino 
Phone: 213-473-7015  Fax: 213-626-5431
Email: councilmember.buscaino@lacity.org

Thank you for taking action to help REDUCE the use of rodenticide in Los Angeles and beyond!

 

 

What Else Can You Do?

In Your Community

  • Attend your next community meeting (ie. HOAs, Residential Associations, Neighborhood Councils, school, religious organization or other community groups) to educate your neighbors about the deleterious effects of these poisons  
  • Ask your community to take a formal stand to abandon the use of ALL anticoagulant rodenticides with a No Rodent Poison resolution.
  • Email your formal resolution to us (some sample community resolutions are below):

Laurel Canyon          Beverly Glen          LACDP

Pest Control Alternatives At Home

  • Do not use anticoagulant poisons
  • Use barn owl nesting boxes
  • Use mechanical traps such as capture, snap or electronic

Eliminate Access

  • Seal all cracks and crevices that may lead into your home, garage, attic, and crawl space
  • Use 1/4 inch metal mesh (not chicken wire) to seal off entry points, and steel wool for smaller holes

Prevent Rodent Issues

  • Minimize elements (food, water, shelter) that are necessary for rodents to survive.
  • Keep trash and recycling areas clean; do not overfill containers
  • Secure trash cans and dumpsters from birds and rodents
  • Maintain landscaping– keep a 2 foot space between bushes; remove tree limbs within 3 feet of structures; keep grass under 2 inches
  • Don’t feed birds or pets outdoors

Remember, poisons should always be properly disposed of as Household Hazardous Waste

  • LA County resource to find safe poison disposal
  • Los Angeles list of places for drop off
  • Click here to find poison free alternatives for homes and businesses